23 4 / 2014

phoenix-falls:

vagisodium:

uninhibitedandunrepentant:

lovesthesmarty:

lsama:

This is the best idea for a restaurant. - Imgur
I DON’T THINK IT’S LITERALLY POSSIBLE FOR ME TO LIKE OR FAV OR UPVOTE THIS ENOUGH

I would like to see more of these.

Is this not a thing in America?
It’s a thing all over here in Australia. You get a wrist band. Means you can buy no booze, but you get free soft drink.

this is a thing in canada too like all you gotta do is say that youre driving

Free….pop….in the US for….DD’s? Free…anything to encourage safe behaviours? 
That’s too much logic for this country. Sounds like Socialist propaganda 

phoenix-falls:

vagisodium:

uninhibitedandunrepentant:

lovesthesmarty:

lsama:

This is the best idea for a restaurant. - Imgur

I DON’T THINK IT’S LITERALLY POSSIBLE FOR ME TO LIKE OR FAV OR UPVOTE THIS ENOUGH

I would like to see more of these.

Is this not a thing in America?

It’s a thing all over here in Australia. You get a wrist band. Means you can buy no booze, but you get free soft drink.

this is a thing in canada too like all you gotta do is say that youre driving

Free….pop….in the US for….DD’s? Free…anything to encourage safe behaviours? 

That’s too much logic for this country. Sounds like Socialist propaganda 

(via therenaissanceratchet)

22 4 / 2014

"My first hysterectomy as a resident was on a 16-year-old who had an illegal abortion. Her pelvis was nothing but pus. That’s the sort of thing we saw all the time. I admitted about two or three women like this every night. That’s what we’re headed towards now. We’re heading back to those days."

Dr. Sherwood Lynn, Texas OBGYN, via http://bit.ly/1hzlqc8 (via noprincessesallowed)

(via caliphorniaqueen)

20 4 / 2014

jointheiww:

marxvx:

Alabama Prisoners to Strike on Easter Sunday
Building on the mass hunger strike of prisoners in Pelican Bay State Prison in July of last year, several hundred prisoners across Alabama have declared that, beginning Easter Sunday, they will stop prison-mandated labor in protest of detestable living conditions.
The conditions in Alabama prisons are horrendous, packing twice as many people as the 16,000 that can be housed “humanely”, with everything from black mold, brown water, cancer causing foods, insect infestations, and general disrepair. They are also run by free slave labor, with 10,000 incarcerated people working to maintain the prisons daily, adding up to $600,000 dollars a day, or $219,000,000 a year of slave labor if inmates were paid federal minimum wage, with tens of thousands more receiving pennies a day making products for the state or private corporations.
Unpaid labor includes cooking and cleaning, production of license plates, furniture, chemicals, and linens, and farming. The slavery analogy is more than metaphorical: African-Americans comprise only 26% of Alabama’s population, but make up more than 60% of the prison population due to reactionary legislation and racist targeting of communities of color. Reports of beatings and systemic rape and sexual abuse of women inmates by guards at Tutwiler State Prison have surfaced in the media over the last year.
(In the US, forced labor produces everything from military equipment to lingerie, school supplies, and food.)
On the outside, labor unions and prisoners’ advocacy groups have been instrumental in helping prisoners organize themselves. The Free Alabama Movement is pushing an “Education, Rehabilitation, and Re-entry Preparedness Bill” to the Alabama legislature, while the Industrial Workers of the World labor union has vowed to provide support and assistance to the incarcerated laborers.
Melvin Ray, spokesperson for the Free Alabama Movement (FAM) said:

When we look at our situations inside of the Alabama Department of Corrections, we have no choice but to engage in this nonviolent and peaceful protest for civil and human rights. We sleep with rats and roaches. We work for free and eat slop unfit for human consumption. We serve decades in prison solely to provide free labor and without any real prospect for parole, and without any recourse to the courts for justice or redress of grievances. Our mothers, wives, and daughters must expose their breasts and panties just to visit us. This should not be acceptable to anyone. Prison is supposed to be a place where people go to work out issues and return to society. But when there is no focus on education or rehab but solely on profit margins, human suffering is inevitable. ADOC is about free labor and the new slavery no one wants to talk about. That is no longer going to work for the 30,000 of us who suffer because of it.

The Industrial Workers of the World was involved in a similar campaign in 1987, in which they organized 400 incarcerated laborers in an Ohio state prison, before the government ruled that prisoners are not legally entitled to the right to form a union - a right which all other workers enjoy.

More on the Free Alabama Movement’s strike

jointheiww:

marxvx:

Alabama Prisoners to Strike on Easter Sunday

Building on the mass hunger strike of prisoners in Pelican Bay State Prison in July of last year, several hundred prisoners across Alabama have declared that, beginning Easter Sunday, they will stop prison-mandated labor in protest of detestable living conditions.

The conditions in Alabama prisons are horrendous, packing twice as many people as the 16,000 that can be housed “humanely”, with everything from black mold, brown water, cancer causing foods, insect infestations, and general disrepair. They are also run by free slave labor, with 10,000 incarcerated people working to maintain the prisons daily, adding up to $600,000 dollars a day, or $219,000,000 a year of slave labor if inmates were paid federal minimum wage, with tens of thousands more receiving pennies a day making products for the state or private corporations.

Unpaid labor includes cooking and cleaning, production of license plates, furniture, chemicals, and linens, and farming. The slavery analogy is more than metaphorical: African-Americans comprise only 26% of Alabama’s population, but make up more than 60% of the prison population due to reactionary legislation and racist targeting of communities of color. Reports of beatings and systemic rape and sexual abuse of women inmates by guards at Tutwiler State Prison have surfaced in the media over the last year.

(In the US, forced labor produces everything from military equipment to lingerie, school supplies, and food.)

On the outside, labor unions and prisoners’ advocacy groups have been instrumental in helping prisoners organize themselves. The Free Alabama Movement is pushing an “Education, Rehabilitation, and Re-entry Preparedness Bill” to the Alabama legislature, while the Industrial Workers of the World labor union has vowed to provide support and assistance to the incarcerated laborers.

Melvin Ray, spokesperson for the Free Alabama Movement (FAM) said:

When we look at our situations inside of the Alabama Department of Corrections, we have no choice but to engage in this nonviolent and peaceful protest for civil and human rights. We sleep with rats and roaches. We work for free and eat slop unfit for human consumption. We serve decades in prison solely to provide free labor and without any real prospect for parole, and without any recourse to the courts for justice or redress of grievances. Our mothers, wives, and daughters must expose their breasts and panties just to visit us. This should not be acceptable to anyone. Prison is supposed to be a place where people go to work out issues and return to society. But when there is no focus on education or rehab but solely on profit margins, human suffering is inevitable. ADOC is about free labor and the new slavery no one wants to talk about. That is no longer going to work for the 30,000 of us who suffer because of it.

The Industrial Workers of the World was involved in a similar campaign in 1987, in which they organized 400 incarcerated laborers in an Ohio state prison, before the government ruled that prisoners are not legally entitled to the right to form a union - a right which all other workers enjoy.

More on the Free Alabama Movement’s strike

(via myownofme)

20 4 / 2014

caliphorniaqueen:

I was talking to my coworker yesterday and she was telling me that her father cheated on her mother in 1973 and her mother never got over it. Some years back she had the garage remodeled to look like a living space and thats where he stays. She didn’t want to divorce him but she couldn’t forgive him. She’s 84 and he’s 86. Women get all the olympic gold medals in the holding grudges competition.

19 4 / 2014

polaroidtransfers:

Heat to the Rescue: Sturdy Oil Drum Survival Kit Also Converts Into Stove.

Like the Haitian earthquake of 2010, last year’s Japanese tsunami disaster spurred designers to re-think what an effective, life-saving response might look like.

Focusing on providing a source of heat, water and food housed in rollable oil drum that can be converted into a stove, Eindhoven-based Japanese designer Hikaru Imamura’s “Heat Rescue Disaster Recovery” kit reflects his belief that something as simple as heat and hot water may mean the difference between falling deathly ill or surviving.

(Source: treehugger.com, via mea-pulchra-don)

18 4 / 2014

gospelbreak:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Costs In California

29207eaf7044c2c6dddbbd6e341198b2

Well, this is a story I never thought would we”d read. According to sources, in California of all places, prison doctors have sterilized over 150 women. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future.

The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.…

View On WordPress

17 4 / 2014

popculturebrain:

New Trailer: ‘Orange Is the New Black' Season 2 - June 6

(via mea-pulchra-don)

16 4 / 2014

teamsternation:

  • $3.98 for natural disaster relief through FEMA
  • $6.96 for welfare
  • $22.88 for unemployment
  • $36.82 for food stamps through SNAP
  • $43.78 for retirement/disability for government workers (civilian/military)
  • $235.81 for YOUR Medicare
  • $247.75 for defense
  • and $4,000.00 for corporate subsidies

Are you sure you are pissed off at the right people?

(via 1beautifulcontradiction)

16 4 / 2014

blackladyblue:

cumfort:

edwardspoonhands:

keab42:

cold-neverbotheredmeanyway:

ohitsjustkim:

stammsternenstaub:

kirkwa:

And This Is Why You Shouldn’t Get Sick In America

Many believe that the US healthcare system is the best in the world. Not so according to the World Health Organization’s ranking of the world’s health systems. The US doesn’t even rank in the top 25. It ranks 37th and is the most expensive in the world. I would argue that even if we had the best healthcare system in the world, what good is it, if no one can afford to access it.

Most companies are buying 60/40-policys for their employees these days, but even if you are lucky enough to have good insurance with 80/20-policy coverage, that 20 percent your responsible for can drive you right into bankruptcy as easily as the 60-40 policy given the cost of healthcare.

Insurance cost have been going up dramatically in the last two decades, long before the new Affordable Healthcare Act has taken affect, in some cases as much as 35% per year.

But have you noticed the latest trick the insurance companies have roll out?

Yes, Higher Deductible… most averaging $5,000 per year, per person, but I have seen some as high as $10,000 per year. For those of you that are wondering, this tactic is specifically designed too stop you from using your insurance. It reduces the insurance companies out of pocket liability by shift costs onto consumers, especially those dealing with chronic illness such as diabetes and arthritis. Consequently, because consumers can’t afford the deductible they will avoid necessary care to save money.

Although insurance companies are a problem, the real crook is the healthcare system it self. A corrupt and bloated system desperately in need of reform!

OKAY SO I KNEW THAT TECHNICALLY IN AMERICA THAT YOU PAY FOR HEALTHCARE BUT LIKE THE IDEA IS SO BIZARRE TO ME THAT I’D NEVER CONSIDERED THAT YOU’D GET… A BILL?????? FOR BEING…. ILL?????????? I LITERALLY DON’T

how can anaesthetic cost that much??

how is this legal??

WHAT? And I thought having to pay £7 ($11.55) for stronger prescription allergy meds instead of £4 ($6.60) for the less effective store-brand ones was ridiculous.

You have to pay for the ambulance!?

OK, I’m shocked by the prices, but all of the people from other countries who are just shocked that there ARE prices just make me so so sad.

This is so screwed up.

You should consider moving to the UK

Seriously, this is insane.

(via 1beautifulcontradiction)

16 4 / 2014

16 4 / 2014

cultureunseen:

The art of Kadir Nelson

(via findingtebeah)

15 4 / 2014

naturallyaprincess:

so true…

naturallyaprincess:

so true…

12 4 / 2014

leeavenney:

lovechangeseverythang:

even when I’m in a spiritual drought,
even when I’m weak,
even when I fail,
even when my heart isn’t focused,
even when I sin,
God is still at work in my life.
God still uses me.
My flaws do not keep Him from loving me.
My tainted flesh doesn’t keep Him from pursuing me.
What a beautiful Father.

This is called Agape love!

(via jazzydreams)

12 4 / 2014

Kali Hawk and Lance Gross in Ava DuVernay’s short film, “Say Yes” (x)

(Source: fuckyeahkalihawk, via blackloveisabeautifulthing)

11 4 / 2014

amorous-t:

humansofnewyork:

"I’m giving a presentation tomorrow on the experience of African American males growing up in America.""What’s the thesis?""Hundreds of interviews have been conducted, and we’ve found that not only do most African American males fail to acknowledge institutional racism, they mainly tend to blame themselves for their failures. They say things like they didn’t work hard enough, or made too many mistakes. They don’t understand that they weren’t afforded the same opportunities."

should I cry now or later?

amorous-t:

humansofnewyork:

"I’m giving a presentation tomorrow on the experience of African American males growing up in America."
"What’s the thesis?"
"Hundreds of interviews have been conducted, and we’ve found that not only do most African American males fail to acknowledge institutional racism, they mainly tend to blame themselves for their failures. They say things like they didn’t work hard enough, or made too many mistakes. They don’t understand that they weren’t afforded the same opportunities."

should I cry now or later?

(via t-amorous)